Rehabilitation of Tutunji House

Mosul, Iraq

Amount $ 800K

Years 2019 - 2022

Operator University of Pennsylvania

Type of grant Call for projects

Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of the University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of the University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of the University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of the University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of the University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences
Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations of the University of Pennsylvania School of Arts and Sciences

Tutunji House, built between 1808 and 1817, is an exceptional example of the late-Ottoman central courtyard house sumptuously decorated with marble bas-reliefs, a symbol of the city’s past as a flourishing centre of international trade. Since 1981, the house belongs to the State Board of Antiquities and Heritage and had been newly renovated when Daesh took over Mosul in 2014. The building was used by Daesh as explosive factory and suffered significant damage during the conflict. It was nearly destroyed before the liberation of the city in 2017.

The University of Pennsylvania is working closely with the State Board of Heritage and Antiquities and the Mosul University to rehabilitate this emblematic house. Following complicated mine clearance operations carried out by the Iraqi army, conservation works started in 2020. In addition to structural work, the project established a stone-carving workshop to produce the unique Mosul Marble relief tiles and support the preservation of this unique craft. The project employs Mosul residents, and it has generated significant economic activities for many local people.